Survey-dirty-streets-boozy-locals-depressing-weather-britain


title: 'Survey Dirty streets boozy locals depressing weather Britain' published: true publish_date: '31-08-2016 14:56' taxonomy: category:

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    A survey has found excessive drinking, bad weather and sarcasm are the biggest complaints foreigners have about living in Britain.  But despite their gripes, two out of three respondents said they enjoyed life in their adopted home. VoR's Vivienne Nunis put the findings to the test. The British stereotype is alive and well – according to expats who’ve moved to the UK. It’s no secret the British public likes a drink or that the weather here is generally rubbish… so it shouldn’t really come as a surprise that those are two of the biggest complaints from expats who move to the UK. Brits "too sarcastic" A new survey says expatriates also dislike Brits’ excessive use of sarcasm - while 20% say they don’t like British food. More than 1400 residents born outside Britain were polled by Globalvisas.com - and for the most part, their answers ensured classic stereotypes about Old Blighty live on. Very polite On a positive note, half of the respondents said British people’s best characteristic was their good manners, while 40% appreciated that particularly British willingness to queue. But worryingly, nearly one third of the expats surveyed said they didn’t likeliving in Britain at all while one quarter said they didn’t really like British people. Sadly, nearly half said moving to the UK hadn’t met their expectations. Could this possibly be true? Voice of Russia took to the streets of Central London to put the findings to the test… “My name is Arafat, I’m from Bangladesh. Honestly I never feel any kind of negative things because everyone is friendly and wherever I went they are accepting my like their friend or brother, it’s a really positive experience.” “My name is Yuki, I’m from Japan. I think very kind people, so example I take bus: “Go ahead” says everyone, so I’m very happy.” "Everyone is friendly" “Anna, I’m from Italy. When I’m lost in the street, English people try to help me find the street, the direction." “I’m South Korean and Hemi Kim. Generally I think the people on the streets are friendly but people in the public sector like the Royal Mail, I’ve heard my friends complain about their attitude.” Those expats seem to think the British public is quite a friendly lot – holding true with the survey’s findings – after all if only one quarter of respondents said they don’t like British people, that means 75% of them do. But surely there must be some complaints? Lots of litter “The street is very dirty. There’s rubbish in the street.” “British people I think for me - no patience, don’t have patience. For me, I speak bad English so it’s difficult to speak with other person, English person.” So the streets are dirty and British people are impatient. But what about the excessive drinking? Survey respondents said that was their least favourite British trait… Boozy Brits “As a bar tender I can see British people drink too much. Some people – not all of them, some people drink until drunk. When I come back from work it’s Saturday night so I can see people are sleeping on the road!” And the weather? Surely that’s worth a whinge… “Now it’s nice but during the winter it’s pretty gruesome and very depressing…The only problem I face is the weather… Sometimes changing like it’s raining then it’s sunny”. Believe it or not, Alessio from Italy said the weather was one of his favourite things about living in London. Just like home “The weather – I like the weather. I like the cold! I live here 8 years, 9 years already. All my friends are British. I like it. It’s home.” Happily, the survey found two thirds of expatriates like their new life in Britain – a fact that was resoundingly echoed on the streets of London to Voice of Russia. Perhaps the most shocking result of all was the rather low percentage of respondents who thought Britons’ lived up to their reputation for drinking tea. Incredibly, only 41% said that particular stereotype rang true.

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